T-Mobile's REVVL Line is Unnecessary

T-Mobile has brought back carrier-exclusive phones in a positive way with their REVVL line. Unlike other carrier-exclusive phones like the Droid and Pixel line from Verizon, where the goal is to entice consumers with flagship phones, the REVVL line are T-Mobile's own budget-friendly phones for consumers who don't need the latest and greatest, but are still looking for decent features. The REVVL phones feature a fingerprint scanner, large screen, and a low price starting at $150 for the REVVL and $200 for the REVVL Plus. They're decent phones, but why do they exist?

There are plenty of phones in the budget category that work well, like Motorola's Moto E and G line. There are many good reasons to choose a Moto E or G, and one reason is that there's plenty of examples of people using them, based off how many reviews there are online. Because you aren't locked to a specific carrier, a greater amount of people will use them. The T-Mobile REVVL on the other hand is still hard to research, because very few people have bought one, in comparison at least. The REVVL has no brand recognition, no solid reviews to go from, and an incredibly unlikely software update future due to the lack of users, so why would anyone take a gamble on it? More importantly, why didn't T-Mobile go after Motorola, or HTC, or any of the fantastic budget to mid-range smartphone manufacturers to sell at T-Mobile stores? I'd much rather see a BlackBerry KEYone, or a Moto G5 Plus, or anything anyone's actually used.

Don't get me wrong, I'm very happy T-Mobile is putting a product that honestly gives a lot of features for the price, but how long will the phone last? How does the phone stack up to the competition? There is no definitive answer, and there may never be because no credible publication has reviewed it. In this new age of $1,000 phones, it's nice to have a low-priced decent alternative, but next time, T-Mobile, please get one of the ones people want. I'd love to buy a magenta KEYone.

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