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T-Mobile's REVVL Line is Unnecessary

T-Mobile has brought back carrier-exclusive phones in a positive way with their REVVL line. Unlike other carrier-exclusive phones like the Droid and Pixel line from Verizon, where the goal is to entice consumers with flagship phones, the REVVL line are T-Mobile's own budget-friendly phones for consumers who don't need the latest and greatest, but are still looking for decent features. The REVVL phones feature a fingerprint scanner, large screen, and a low price starting at $150 for the REVVL and $200 for the REVVL Plus. They're decent phones, but why do they exist?

There are plenty of phones in the budget category that work well, like Motorola's Moto E and G line. There are many good reasons to choose a Moto E or G, and one reason is that there's plenty of examples of people using them, based off how many reviews there are online. Because you aren't locked to a specific carrier, a greater amount of people will use them. The T-Mobile REVVL on the other hand is s…

Chrome OS vs Windows 10 on a 10 Year Old Laptop

As a college student, it's nice to have a laptop to throw in the backpack for notes and work. The downside is the amount of stress being placed on said laptop, because a backpack isn't the safest place for anything, let alone fragile laptops. So I decided to have a dedicated laptop just for backpack-ing. However, I don't have the cash for a brand new one, nor do I want to risk damaging a new one, so I use a 2008-ish Dell Latitude D630 I had lying around, as I spoke about here. However, at that point, I was using Windows 10, which ran pretty well. Now I'm giving Chrome OS a try. How does it stack up?

Now this isn't full-on Chrome OS, but rather Chromium OS being developed by NeverWare for their CloudReady operating system. Installation is simple with a USB flash drive, and I could've dual booted, but this solid state drive is just 60 GB, so I decided against that. Compared to Windows 10, startup is not as fast, and that's only by a few seconds. The overall u…

HP Deskjet 2655 Review: How Bad Can Budget Be?

We live in a darn-near paperless world, where email reigns, text messages replace the passed-notes, and phone reminders take over for sticky notes. However, there will be that one time you need to print that random thing, and a printer will come in handy. When you just need a basic wireless printer, how bad is buying the cheapest one?
I've decided to test this out. I purchased an HP Deskjet 2655 for dirt cheap, $25 on clearance, which is less than the cost of some printer's ink cartridges. It's not the smallest printer, but it's very light. In the package includes the USB cable, which doesn't come with many printers, the power cable, and the instructions. Since the printer does not have a touch screen, you will have to plug it into a computer for setup. You can visit 123.hp.com/dj2655 for the link to the drivers and instructions, but if you have Windows 8 or 10, I recommend going to the Windows Store, and downloading an app called HP Smart, which makes the installa…

Dell Latitude D630 Review: 10 Years Later

As a college student, it's very helpful to have a laptop to take from class to class. Whether it's for notes or research, the convenience alone of keeping organized digitally is something I find very helpful. However, I didn't want to take my daily laptop, the Lenovo Yoga 2 Pro, for a few reasons. It's a pretty pricey laptop with lots of breakable parts, like the touchscreen. Plus, it has no removable battery, so should the battery crap out, it becomes useless. It's also light and thin, which is great, but that also raises the question of durability. So what's the solution? You may be surprised that I carry around, and enjoy using a laptop originally certified for Windows Vista. It's the Dell Latitude D630, which could very well be 10 years old. I did not buy it new back then, I bought this from a seller on eBay who refurbished it a bit. They gave it a new keyboard, and cleaned it up. Or, this lived its entire life docked on a desk. I don't know what li…

One Quick Trick to Make Windows (Possibly) Faster

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A few years ago, I bought a used Dell Latitude E6510 with an Intel Core i7, and 8 GB of RAM with the intention of having a fast laptop. On paper, it sounded like it made sense. However, when I turned on the laptop, it was far from fast. I figured maybe this could be a slow hard drive, which it was. I was looking around in all the harder to find spots to see if something weird was wrong with the computer, such as a bad driver being installed. I then noticed when I hovered over the battery icon that the power setting was set to power saver. I did a quick Google search and found that, yes, that can slow down your computer!

To change this, or to see what your Windows power setting is set to can be found in one of two places. One way is to press Windows key and X. If you're running Windows 8 or above, a menu will pop up in the bottom left corner, and you're going to want to press Mobility Center. I believe on Windows 7, pressing Win + X just brings up the Mobility Center, but I do…

Which Streaming TV Box Is Right For You?

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We live in a smart world, where everything needs to be connected. We have smartphones, smart homes, and smart TVs. However, what if your TV isn't smart, or maybe not smart enough? That's where a streaming box comes into play. A streaming box allows you to connect to the internet to play content from Netflix, Hulu, YouTube, Pandora, Spotify, and iHeart Radio just to name a few. So, when you're shopping for a good streaming box, here's a list of the major ones, and the pros and cons of them. I'm excluding boxes that handle over-the-air, or cable like Channel Master, and TiVo because streaming is only part of the goal there, and I'm excluding Android TV boxes because those are developed by third-party folk.
The Major PlayersRoku - Of all the companies on this list, Roku is the only one that solely makes streaming boxes, and they've been doing so since 2008, starting out as a Netflix box. They've evolved over the years to allow more content, and even beat …

BlackBerry 10: A late look at the aging OS

I remember writing about BlackBerry 10 way back in 2013, where although I was impressed by the polish of the operating system, I was also at the time very much into Windows Phone, and felt that BB10 was merely just playing catch up with Microsoft. Had I not been so much in love with the Lumia 920, or 1520 that I had at the time, who knows, maybe I would've given BlackBerry a whirl at the time, because they were mighty purdy. Fast forward a year from 2013, and BlackBerry wasn't doing much better at adding users to its platform. Finally, in 2015, BlackBerry announced the Priv, the company's first Android device, thus sending a signal that BlackBerry 10 is no longer the BlackBerry's priority. So how does BlackBerry 10 run in 2017, in a world where Windows Phone can no longer maintain a market share above a full percentage point?

Let's first talk about the device itself. The phone of choice is the Q10. Why? Because what is a BlackBerry without a physical keyboard? Now …